Nuclear energy in 2017

December 16th, 2016

Posted by Suzanna Hinson

An increasing number of countries are embracing nuclear as one solution to their energy needs. Much progress has been made in 2016, and progress is likely to continue into 2017. However, with the scale of the energy and climate challenges, greater ambition is needed in the nuclear sector. 2017 should be the turning point in which a new, advanced nuclear age begins.

This year the UK finally approved the Hinkley Point C European Pressurised Reactor. Although far from the best design, the first nuclear power plant in a generation is worthy of celebration. The UK continued its support for advanced nuclear too, with the Small Modular Reactor competition launched and further funding for nuclear innovation allocated. In 2017 the Generic Design Assessment (GDA) for the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor will likely be completed and the results of the SMR competition announced. But progress remains slow and the UK should combat this with greater regulatory capacity as well as investment in options which use spent fuel and plutonium as a resource rather than waste.

New nuclear is making more progress across the Atlantic in North America. In the USA, four new reactors are being constructed and many more are planned. The Obama administration gave grants to two emerging reactor designs under its GAIN initiative. It is unclear whether this support will continue in 2017 with President Elect Donald Trump being pro-nuclear, but also pro-fossil fuel.

Justin Trudeau’s government in Canada has been more supportive of nuclear than many had expected when he was elected in 2015. Candu reactors continue to be pursued around the world, but in Canada itself policy has turned towards new designs, including Molten Salt Reactors. Canada has also committed to working on a new long-term energy plan for the future. In 2017 Canada should push ahead with MSRs and ensure its new energy plan recognises the benefits of nuclear power.

Despite this progress in Europe and America, it is in the East that the greatest progress on nuclear power has been achieved. Russia continues to lead the world on fast reactors, with its Beloyarsk reactor turned up to 100% power. In 2017 the Russians should continue this trend and build on their ambitious sodium cooled fast reactor program.

Japan has continued to restart its nuclear power stations in 2016 following the nation-wide shutdown post-Fukushima. As the country begins to benefit from the lower bills and reduced demand on often-imported fossil fuels, this trend should accelerate with Japan re-embracing its nuclear infrastructure.

China has been pushing ahead with all types of energy and all types of nuclear reactors. As air pollution and energy security cause concern, the government is planning a doubling of nuclear capacity to at least 58 GWe by 2020-21, then up to 150 GWe by 2030. China is working on some of the most advanced reactors in the world, including the molten salt program, and intends to export this expertise more in the coming years.

Similarly India has made great progress with nuclear in 2016. Multiple projects comprising multiple types of reactors are under construction or planning. The prototype fast reactor is expected to go critical in 2017 allowing India to enter the second stage of its 3 stage nuclear power program for Thorium.

2017 looks likely to be a year of global progress on nuclear energy. Leadership in this field is certainly shifting East. The West should take note of this progress, and do more to keep up. The energy security advantages of nuclear are more widely recognised and the commercial rewards on offer from the global nuclear market are growing. Other low-carbon energy sources – renewables and carbon capture and storage – are important and much greater energy efficiency is essential. But with the challenges the world faces in 2017 and for the rest of the century, nuclear is more vital than ever, to provide safe, secure and sustainable energy for all.

Comments

  1. Shawn says:

    Dealing with Climate and getting rid of Waste and Recycled LWR uranium and used fuel in PHWRs – AFCR (CANDU) unit can use recycled fuel from four light water reactors to generate some six million MWh of additional carbon-free electricity.
    You can use DUPIC that stands for Direct Use of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel in CANDU. CANDU is the Canadian heavy water nuclear reactor. The extra cost of DUPIC has been estimated to be six to ten percent above the once-through cost. DUPIC fuel cycle could reduce a country’s need for used PWR fuel disposal by 70% while reducing fresh uranium requirements by 30%. A high net destruction rate can be achieved of actinides and plutonium, too. Burn remaining Plutonium & Actinides in Molten Salt Reactors. Anything leftover is now < 500 years radiological storage problem at fraction of size. Also, using the Indian AHWR design, you may start breeding U233 for molten salt reactors. Google “Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) DUPIC”, Indian “AHWR”, “MIT Floating Power Plant”, "Molten Salt Reactor”, “Lightbridge Thorium”, “Graphene filters could cut the cost of heavy water production”, ”Separation of Tritiated Water using graphene”, “Advanced Fuel CANDU Reactor (AFCR)”

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